1901-1953 Indian Motorcycle – Parts – Accessories

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  5. 127 – Care Of Duckworth Drive Chains

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CARE AND LUBRICATION
OF
DUCKWORTH REAR DRIVE MOTORCYCLE CHAINS FOR ARMY SERVICE

Rear drive motorcycle chains operating most of the time at high speed provide a very difficult problem in lubricating efficiency.

The chains operating in the open without means of providing enclosed or automatic lubrication collect sand dust and grit which work their way into the chain joints. causing them to become stiff and to wear excessively.

It is just as important to properly lubricate the bearings of a motorcycle chain as it is to lubricate the bearings on any other integral part of the motorcycle. If the pins, bushings and rollers of the chain are allowed to become bone dry — excessive elongation, “stiff joints” and uneven wear will result. If dirt and other foreign matter is allowed to stay upon the chain for any period of time, they will eventually work their way into the precision made chain bearings, scoring the hardened surfaces and doing irreparable damage to the chain.

Smearing non fluid grease on the surface of chain is a doubtful lubricating expedient due to the fact that it does not penetrate into the chain bearings, and acts as a catch-all for road dust and debris.

We recommend that two methods of lubrication be used on rear drive motorcycle chains used in army service, as follews:

PERIODIC LUBRICATION AT EVERY 250 MILES

(a) Leave chain on motorcycle.
{b) Jack up machine and clean off surface sand and dirt with brush or waste.
{c) Revolve chain and pour kerosene on slack side, preferably with a spout can. If spout can is not obtainable, use waste saturated in kerosene.
(d) Start motor and revolve chain slowly until kerosene dispelled.
(e) Pour engine oil (preferably #10 or #20) on slack side of chain. Care should be used when applying the oil so that it penetrates between the inside and outside chain plates inasmuch as it is more easily carried to the pin in this manner.

PERIODIC LUBRICATION AT EVERY 1000 MILES
( TO BE MADE IN ADDITION TO THE 250 MILE LUBRICATION DESCRIBED ABOVE)

(a) Take the used chain off the machine, putting it in a shallow pan with a piece of wire netting or substitute in the bottom of the pan to keep the chain about 1/2″ above the bottom. Cover the chain with kerosene, and soak thoroughly. When the dirt and old oil are dissolved, shake the chain well in the kerosene and then clean it, inspecting every joint, making sure they are free from dirt and flexible.
(b) Immerse the chain in a pan of hot grease, heated to a consistency of ordinary light cylinder oil. Allow the chain to
soak in this mixture for a short time, keeping the grease hot if possible, and moving the chain so that the grease will reach all inside parts of the chain.
Take the chain out, wiping off all the surplus oil from surface of chain.
Note: When conditions render it impossible to immerse chain in the melted grease, substitute immersion in pan containing #10 or #20 fluid oil.
(c) Install chain back on motorcycle. If this procedure is followed, a hard lubricating material will be incorporated in
all vital wearing parts of the chain after it is dried.
Less road dirt will be picked up by the apparently dry, yet well lubricated chain, and longer life and greater satisfaction
will be obtained.
Every Duckworth motorcycle chain leaving our factory after coming from the Assembly Department is heated in a hot bath of grease as described above.
Reference:
The following references regarding proper grease for lubricating motorcycle chains as described above are intended to
be descriptive but not restrictive. Many other fine products are obtainable on the open market.

Non-Fluid Oil C-#10-12 grade manufactured by N.Y. & N.J. Lubricating Co., 292 Madison Ave., N. Y. City.
Grade “D” Petroleum grease manufactured by Atlantic Refining Company.

BALDWIN-DUCKWORTH
J. F. McCann
Chief Engineer
Springfield Plant
INDIAN MOTOCYCLE COMPANY
C. E. Raymond
Service Manager

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